Install XMind to Fedora

I’ve been using XMind a lot for mindmapping. It has fulfilled my needs somewhat well, at least I cannot come up with anything to nag about from the top of my head.

Except that there is only *.deb -package available for Linux. For the love of <pick your favorite deity here>. Not all of us are using Ubuntu. Don’t get me wrong, Ubuntu is ok to use. I’m not using it due to our servers are running CentOS. To get to know the issues you might run into when dealing with production, you should be using same (or at least one that is based on the same architecture) operating system on your workstation. So i do have Fedora, which is not CentOS, but close enough. I do admit being lazy here, there is CentOS -desktop available, but to get the tools needed to work with that is so much harder than with Fedora, that I did not even try this time. I might do that in the future, though.

Enough for OS rant.

  1. Download Xmind for linux from vendor site
  2. Uncompress the deb -package with ar
    1. [bluntinstrument@testing Downloads]$ ar -x xmind-x.y-xyz-linux_amd64.deb
  3. There will be 2 tarballs extracted, data.tar.gz & control.tar.gz
  4. Untar data.tar.gz:
    1. [bluntinstrument@testing Downloads]$ tar xf data.tar.gz
    2. You get a subfolder usr/
  5. [bluntinstrument@testing Downloads]$ sudo cp -r usr/bin/ /opt/xmind/
  6. [bluntinstrument@testing Downloads]$ sudo cp -r usr/lib/ /usr/
  7. [bluntinstrument@testing Downloads]$ sudo cp -r usr/share/ /usr/
  8. Untar control.tar.gz:
    1. [bluntinstrument@testing Downloads]$ tar xf control.tar.gz
    2. You get a script ‘postinst’
  9. [bluntinstrument@testing Downloads]$ sudo sh postinst
  10. Create symlink for XMind:
    1. sudo ln -s /opt/xmind/bin/XMind /usr/local/bin/XMind

And you’re good to go 😀

I used this guide as a reference: http://www.xmind.net/m/JKm6/ 

 

They should make a movie out of this 

One thing first. WordPress app seems not to be able to send the image in case I press settings when it is uploading. Hence the rectangle below.

This was actually my message. They ought to do a movie out of this.

img_2943-1

I know they’ve done Blade Runner (Which is brilliant) and they’re planning on a sequel, but there’s few angles in the book you could consider. One of them being the Voight-Kampff empathy test. Which also strikes me, as a tester.

Books are great. Great books even more.

Excuses get in the way

I know, every excuse is just an excuse on failing to prioritise, but sometimes the prioritising actually gets you nailed down to something where you just have to concentrate and work on.  This week has been one of those.

So to say, releases flowing in from doors and windows and I find myself testing (or wanting to test) them all.

Which of course has meant that I haven’t been able to fulfil the 30 Days of Testing assignments. Currently I am lagging behind 1½ – 2 days. My plan is to get back on the track during this week, anyhow, meaning that I’ll do something during the weekend.

This is just to inform that I am aware of the situation.

Besides that, I ended up going through this tutorial yesterday and realised that this mochaJs-thing seems to be a neat way to learn JavaScript and some test development 😀 I might even give it a more thorough run later on. I also discussed with the author (Viktor Johansson) on collaborating and creating some neat tutorial with BDD & Robot Framework. Oh, and managed to install Skype on the Fedora, which is always an accomplishment 😉

We’ll see what tomorrow brings.

D3 – 30 Days Of Testing – Listen to a testing podcast

Yesterday’s challenge was to listen to a testing podcast. So I went to iTunes Store, which is the de facto standard when it come to podcasts, at least in my books. In fact, the sole reason for me using iPhone, to be honest. Otherwise I don’t care (not any more) which manufacturer or OS my phone has. After testing Symbian (Nokia & SonyEricsson used that OS in their phones) and using Android & iOS, I’m getting more and more aware that most of them have their good and bad downsides (yes, that’s what I meant).

I do have, sometimes irritating, tendency to get lost while babbling. And that is precisely what happened up there. Now I gather myself and get back to the track.

So, I found the podcast. It is Joe Colantonio’s Test Talk. A series of podcasts on testing and test automation. Since the subject is somewhat intriguing, I ended up subscribing to that, too. Seems to be long enough episodes to listen during the way to work, whether I ride my bike or the subway.

I ended up listening the episode where Rosie Sherry was attending as guest. And I was positively surprised. Not to mean that I was expecting something lousy, but the thing is that the episode made me think. Which is always a good thing. Regardless on what I said yesterday.

She was talking the importance of testing instead of testing tools, and I found myself agreeing. Even though this blog has been about the tools, I realised that my main focus has been telling that regardless of the tools, the skill of testing is what matters. Or at least that is what I should’ve been saying; for that is what I actually mean about the blunt instruments. They are just tools we use, tools in order to help us provide the knowledge about the behaviour (sometimes even vision of quality) of the software we’re testing. At least I think I should be pushing my writing to that one.

What I mean here is that subconsciously I have thought the same way (Now I hope I got it right, too), but not being completely aware of that. It’s not the tools, it’s the way you use them.

Funny thing is that the other day, few days ago, I got a question in Twitter from a former colleague about what SW test automation books he should be reading. And all I could say was  ‘How Google Tests Software’, ‘ATDD by Example’ & ‘Lessons learned in Software Testing’. To be honest, I don’t know much more. I’ve been using the tools, not reading about them. And that has always been my approach in life, in general. Experiment, fix on the run, read when you need. I don’t read the manuals, not before I don’t know what to do. Sometimes I read them too late, maybe too shallowly, and skip some important stuff. I just don’t seem to get myself working the other way. I am an experimental tester, as it seems.

Besides the tools, Joe lifted up also the communities Rosie has been founding: The Ministry Of Testing, Testing Dojo & Software Testing Club. And immediately (after getting to work) I found myself browsing more information about the Dojo and the TestBash happenings etc. I was hooked, there’s a community of testers! Seems to be I’ve been living in my own man -cave for few years now. Let’s see what the communities and the future brings up. At least now I feel excited 😀

So, thanks for Rosie & Joe for showing me one more door to the world of testing !

 

 

Testing in popular culture

This morning, while browsing for a podcast for this 30 Days Of testing -challenge, I found myself thinking. Yes I know, it’s a harsh condition and I try to avoid it regularly, but one can’t help oneself. Not when you’re born this way, you know, with brains and all.

Anyhow, I started thinking, who was the test engineer in Starfleet Academy that tested Kobayashi Maru? Clearly, for it being a computer scenario, it should’ve been tested. How otherwise could’ve James T. Kirk beaten it, even by cheating? And furthermore, in the ship, there’s only operators available, mainly. Someone must have been done a hell of a coding in order to get the USS Enterprise to get around the orbit in the first place. And, as we all know, when there’s a developer there should be a tester available.

Which brings me to this: Is there testing involved in popular culture? In the ‘Saving Matt Damon’ – movie, The Martian (which by the way is a great book, not as good movie, Ridley Scott blew it), NASA does skip the tests, based on risk assessment, apparently,  in order to send the supplies to the Mars a bit more earlier, even the length of the tests is slightly discussed. That’s most likely due to that the author of the book is, if I recall correctly, a SW engineer.

But is there more QA/Test references in popular culture? If not, why not? We’re working on a field of SW (Well, HW needs to be tested, too, but that’s another story) and the field gets bigger and bigger all the time. It is clearly so, nowadays, that hackers and developers can actually tell people what their profession is and people in general have some sort of clue what they are doing for living.

Me, in the other hand, if I tell my profession to my relatives, am faced with a puzzled smile and slightly confused glare. Which I can buy, nobody seems to know what this testing is and what it is all about. Getting more testing stories in popular culture would actually help a bit.

It would be interesting to know, if I’m wrong here. What I know, is the narrow field of popular culture I’ve been following. I might be completely wrong, which is always all so human.

By the way, did you know that the Chernobyl disaster  was caused by running tests? Some experiments, as it seems. Sounds slightly like exploratory testing to me. It’s always a refreshing thought when someone bashes around the nuclear plant systems.

Just one more: Who was the guy, who tested the Death Star particle exhaust vents security? And who approved the solution?

Note: And the answer comes from the  deeps of Twitter:

Thanks, @Marcel_Gehlen

PS. I did find the podcast, too.